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Photo credit: Centenary olive tree, by Carlos Relvas, 1873.
Stereoscopic albumen print. Casa dos Patudos - Museu de Alpiarça Collection

Tom Gunning

Tom Gunning works on problems of film style and interpretation, film history and film culture. His published work (approximately one hundred publications) has concentrated on early cinema (from its origins to the WW I) as well as on the culture of modernity from which cinema arose (relating it to still photography, stage melodrama, magic lantern shows, as well as wider cultural concerns such as the tracking of criminals, the World Expositions, and Spiritualism). His concept of the “cinema of attractions” has tried to relate the development of cinema to other forces than storytelling, such as new experiences of space and time in modernity, and an emerging modern visual culture. His book D.W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film traces the ways film style interacted with new economic structures in the early American film industry and with new tasks of story telling. His forthcoming book on Fritz Lang deals with the systematic nature of the director’s oeuvre and the processes of interpretation. He has written on the Avant-Garde film, both in its European pre-World War I manifestations and the American Avant-Garde film up to the present day. He has also written on genre in Hollywood cinema and on the relation between cinema and technology. The issues of film culture, the historical factors of exhibition and criticism and the spectator’s experience throughout film history are recurrent themes in his work.

 

Denis Pellerin

Denis Pellerin is a photo-historian with a passion for stereo photography. He has been researching and learning about the history of stereo photography for over 30 years and has written several articles and books on the subject, both in French and in English.

During his thirtieth year as a secondary school teacher, Denis had the good fortune to meet and work with Dr. Brian May before being hired by the latter as the curator of his extensive photographic collection.

Brian May and Denis Pellerin have now co-authored three books together (Diableries: Stereoscopic Adventures in Hell, 2013, The Poor Man’s Picture Gallery, 2014, Crinoline: Fashion’s Most Magnificent Disaster, 2016) and are currently working on a couple more publications while being also deeply involved in the various activities of The London Stereoscopic Company, re-created by Brian May in 2008.

Since September 2015 Pellerin has been the director of the said company whose original motto, “No home without a stereoscope”, is more than ever valid.

Carlos Teixidor

Carlos Teixidor Cadenas works with 19th-century photography since 1983. He is the curator of historical photography at the Institute of Cultural Heritage of Spain (IPCE), Ministry of Culture and Sports, in Madrid. He has published several books, such as “Photography in the Canary Islands and Madeira. The era of daguerreotype, collodion and albumen 1839-1900” and “The postcard in Spain. 1892-1915” (Espasa, 1999). His publications also include articles published in academic and non-academic journals, as well as in conference proceedings. He has worked as a curator for exhibitions in Spain and other countries.

 

Elizabeth Edwards

Elizabeth Edwards is a visual and historical anthropologist and is currently Andrew W. Mellon Professor at the Victoria and Albert Museum Research Institute, London. She is Professor Emerita of Photographic History at De Montfort University, Leicester, where she was Director of the Photographic History Research Centre from 2011- 2016. She is also Honorary Professor in the Department of Anthropology University College London. Until 2005 she was Curator of Photographs at Pitt Rivers Museum and lecturer in visual anthropology at ISCA, University of Oxford, where she is a Curator Emerita and Research Affiliate.Specialising in the social and material practices of photography, she has worked extensively on the relationships between photography, anthropology and history for over 30 years. From 2010-12, she led European-funded project PhotoCLEC, on photography, museums and colonial memory.  She is on the Advisory Board of the National Science and Media Museum (Science Museum Group) and in 2014 received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Visual Anthropology (American Anthropological Association), followed by the Photography Prize of the Royal Anthropological Institute in 2017. In 2015 she was the first photographic specialist to be elected a Fellow of the British Academy. She is currently working on an ethnography of the relationship between photography, history and public histories, and on cultures of photography in museums. She is a co-editor of the book series Photography History: History Photography and is currently completing a book on photography and the practice of history.

 

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